The Future Of Home Health Care

We look at the experience of domestic and home health care workers who are among the most vulnerable during the pandemic.

Guests

Ai-jen Poo, co-founder and executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance. (@aijenpoo)

Rep. Ro Khanna, he represents California’s 17th Congressional District. Co-author of the “Essential Workers Bill of Rights” proposal. (@RoKhanna)

From The Reading List

New York Times: “Opinion: The Future of Work Isn’t What People Think It Is” — “The stories we used to tell about work went something like this: The protagonist, a white man wearing a hard hat, has a stable job in manufacturing or construction that allows him to buy a home and work toward a comfortable retirement.”

Business Times: “Covid-19 has opened a new chapter for America’s workforce” — “The stories we used to tell about work went something like this: The protagonist, a white man wearing a hard hat, has a stable job in manufacturing or construction that allows him to buy a home and work towards a comfortable retirement.”

New York Review Of Books: “Who Cares? Now, All of Us Must” — “I came to realize in a series of waves the enormous impact this pandemic would have on the domestic workforce.”

WHYY: “Is the future of elder care at home?” — “John Stagliano never was much of a hospital guy.”

CNBC: “Home health-care workers in US at tipping point amid coronavirus outbreak” — “The nation’s 3.3 million home health-care workers are the other front-line heroes in the war against the coronavirus.”

Washington Post: “A new economic austerity could be ‘as life-threatening as the virus itself,’ says head of the National Domestic Workers Alliance” — “… The number of people who are recognizing caregivers and grocery workers for the first time is a transformative shift in our culture.”

Fast Company: “How COVID-19 has given the labor movement new urgency” — “We work with the workforce that provides caregiving and cleaning services in the home—so the nannies, the house cleaners, the home care workers who are caring for the aging or supporting people with disabilities, and a lot of people with chronic illnesses, too, who are staying at home.”